Topic: oboe stacatto concepts

I am interested to hear how different players/teachers describe the physical actions of playing stacatto. I get a lot of young students who stop the note with the tongue- "tut" and it is one of the first habits I try to break. I know this can be used in specific situations, but generally is not the standard for stacatto.
I was taught to do stacatto by a pulse or rather ending the note with air. kind of like saying HA! but starting with the tongue. The air briefly stops. I was speaking to another oboist who said "no, don't ever stop the air". I am not sure if I actually do stop the air, especially in fast passages. Any ideas on how to best describe this articulation?

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Re: oboe stacatto concepts

My teacher explains on and off the wind. On-stopping the reed with your tongue and keeping the air pressure up while the tongue is on the reed. For stacato just keep your tongue on the reed until the next note. For regular and legato just keep the air pressure. For both don't use unnecessary accents. Off-dropping air pressure between notes...
In general, pretend you are using the syllables di or tu. Not ta or tut. Don't move your mouth when you articulate. Saying tu minimizes that. Keep your tongue close to the reed. Tongue lightly, don't jab the reed. An accent is not a punchy note it is just more volume on one note than the others.

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