Topic: Tie-off length for Gilbert -1 English horn cane

I have English horn cane shaped on a Gilbert -1 shaper. At what length should I tie it onto the staple?

David Crispin
Crispin's Creations and Accessories
freelance oboist. Mississippi Symphony Orchestra
www.CrispinsCreations.com

Re: Tie-off length for Gilbert -1 English horn cane

As long as possible (per David Weber) ensuring that you don't incur leaks either side of where the oval end of the staple meets the cane. If you get a healthy "pop" with fleshy part of thumb held against the reed opening & sucking/releasing on the round end of the staple, you're there. Make sure you trim the ears & chop the reed open immediately after tying. Words of wisdom from John Mack & Tom Stacy.

Best,

john

Best,

john

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Re: Tie-off length for Gilbert -1 English horn cane

Hi David:

Sending to you, by separate email, is a copy of a English horn reed measurement drawing that works for RDG type shapers and most others: tie length that works well is 59.50mm (+/- .50mm),  the staple used is a Chiarugi French type No. 2 with collar-silver or brass (Chiarugi-Italy is also the manufacturer of staples that are rebranded by leading suppliers world-wide), cane diameter 12 to 12.50 and 93mm in length both available at www.oboemn.com.

Kind Regards:

Don Werdick
Oboist & Cane Processing Services
218-290-0103
Member: IDRS and the American Federation of Musicians
Web-site: www.oboemn.com
Email: oboe@cpinternet.com

Re: Tie-off length for Gilbert -1 English horn cane

Both John and Don have spoken to the point without actually mentioning it: the proper tie length for any cane, oboe or EH, is a function of the diameter of the tube at the small end. Different maker's tubes have different small end diameters, but, as John says, you need enough cane to wrap around the tube and seal. If you tie on too long the reed will obviously leak, since there's not enough cane to fully wrap around. If you tie on too short the dangers are more obscure; either the excess cane will crush onto the staple, springing open the sides further up the reed, or the wrapping will tie the edges of the cane together but not bind them tightly to the tube, thus damping the vibration of the blades.

I tell my students to constrain their tube collection to one kind, all of which fit their mandrel. Then, as you wrap, mark the end of the tube on the cane and experiment until the sides close one turn before the mark. That last turn securely snugs the sides together without springing them.

If you measure from the fold to the wrapping and mark all your cane of the same shape that same distance from the fold, you should find all your reeds sealing. A different shape or staple will need to have this same process repeated to find the sweet spot for that shape...

Don's numbers are a good example. Although they will work on his Chiarugi staples, I've got 5 bucks that says they won't work on a Chudnow staple.

Like so much else it's a trial and error process in the beginning, and the most important concept is consistency. Eliminate as many variables as possible...

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