Topic: Shaping already profiled cane with a straight shaper

Anyone do this? I know it's not ideal. Usually with a straight shaper you shape first, then profile, and if you profile first you should use a fold-over shaper.

But let's say you got a really great straight shaper but didn't have a profiler. What would be a suggested way of making sure you got a good shaping done without splitting the blade area when using a shaper on pre-profiled cane?

Any tips? (pun intended)

M.M.A., D.M.A. University of Illinois at Urbana/Champaign: B.Mus. Lawrence University
Bassoon professor at University of Wisconsin Eau-Claire
Maker of the Little-Jake electric bassoon pickup and Weasel bassoon reeds

Re: Shaping already profiled cane with a straight shaper

This is my usual method. The only times I've done it the other (your) way were in school - I'd be waiting for the studio profiler and shaping my cane in the mean time. But, I usually shape already profiled cane on my Fox 2 straight shaper. I don't think I use any special techniques, but since I've always done it this way, I guess I wouldn't know the difference. When you use your straight shaper (with unprofiled cane), what's your standard sequence of cuts?

Re: Shaping already profiled cane with a straight shaper

So far I haven't even tried it. I shaped some cane on a straight shaper in grad school, but that was pre-profiling. So I've never done it the other way. I don't think I learned it any different than how anyone uses a shaper. I watched Terry Ewell's video and other than the fact that it looks like he does two pieces at a time, it's the same process for me (going towards the narrowest part of the cane).

M.M.A., D.M.A. University of Illinois at Urbana/Champaign: B.Mus. Lawrence University
Bassoon professor at University of Wisconsin Eau-Claire
Maker of the Little-Jake electric bassoon pickup and Weasel bassoon reeds

Re: Shaping already profiled cane with a straight shaper

Yup, that's all I do. It's sometimes slightly tricky starting a cut from the middle since the cane there is so thin. But, it'll probably take you all of 1-2 pieces to get used to it.

Re: Shaping already profiled cane with a straight shaper

One of the advantages of using a fold-over shaper to shape profiled cane is that you can get the spine in the center of the shaper tip.  If you use a straight shaper with profiled cane you can't see the spine alignment inside the shaper.  If you have no spine on your profile this problem is moot. If you shape gouged cane then you have the problem of getting the shaped cane centered on the profiler easel. Some modern profilers have lines marked on the easel to enable the centering of the cane. If you have an older profiler that doesn't have centering lines you can have a local machine shop do this for you as I did on my Popkin profiler easel.

Dale Clark

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Re: Shaping already profiled cane with a straight shaper

The particular cane I'm using doesn't have a spine, and I don't typically scrape with a spine in mind anyway. It's eccentric gouged though, so I will have to be careful to line it up. The profile is honestly pretty bad, but that's why I have a tip profiler. :-D

I guess I'll just have to take it carefully. I was never very good at shaping. Dale, my time with you was the only time I ever did any shaping or profiling of my own. I avoided it later because I didn't have my own equipment and didn't want to get used to equipment I didn't own.

M.M.A., D.M.A. University of Illinois at Urbana/Champaign: B.Mus. Lawrence University
Bassoon professor at University of Wisconsin Eau-Claire
Maker of the Little-Jake electric bassoon pickup and Weasel bassoon reeds

Re: Shaping already profiled cane with a straight shaper

Trent,

I actually just did this last night! Normally i shape unprofiled, but I was trying out some profiled cane from a friend.

It's essentially the same as when you shape unprofiled, you just have to be a bit more careful. When you make the initial cuts, I make them smalled than when I do unprofiled, because I don't want to tear away the much thinner cane, since it'll rip a lot easier. Also, profiled cane might not be as smooth of a shape since the thinner cane doesn't sit quite as flush as the unprofiled cane does, so you might need to tough up some rough edges with sane paper. Good luck!

Derek

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