Topic: Bassoon brands

I Have been playing bassoon for about 2 1/2 years and am looking for a good bassoon but i also want to keep my arm and leg. what are some openions about Adler ,laurel , amate,and selmer ? if i bought a europeaion bassoon is the quality control in europe the same as the states? also what places are good places to buy a bassoon? also i do i pay for one? monthley payments? a loan? any featurs to look for? (I would like one with a high d key and made of wood) any help would be appreciated.


MR Bassoon
9th grade Bassoon player       smile


P.S. pardon my gramer it aint no good

Last edited by Mr Bassoon (2007-10-04 15:50:53)

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Re: Bassoon brands

Your best bet when looking for a bassoon is to have an experienced professional bassoonist (that has nothing to gain by the sale) help you pick out a bassoon that is right for you.

Your quality control statement is a bit naive.  The most popular and sought after brand is usually considered Heckel, a German manufacturer.  Basically it has nothing to do with where the instrument comes from as much as who specifically the maker is.  One can't speak broadly about Eurpoean makers or even German makers because there are quite a few, some are typically better than others.

If you're looking to not spend all that much but get a quality instrument that you can take all the way through college and possibly into the professional world, look at the following models, not in any particular order:
Fox 240 or 220
Moosmann 100 or 150
Puchner 2000 (not sure how the price compares)

In general expect to spend at least $4000 (if you're lucky!) for something of really long term value.  You can find other solutions that can get you by, of course, but they're generally not as popular.  A competent bassoonist should be able to fill in more details.  There are good student level bassoons that are less expensive than this, but I don't want to detail those.  In general I think the three manufacturers listed above are the only ones I'd suggest getting a less expensive instrument from as well.

You'll find most others to be less popular with professional or semi-professional players although you will occasionally run across others.  In what I expect is your price range other brands don't offer the same quality as the three that I mentioned although you'll probably hear differing opinions on that.  Above your price range (above the $12,000 mark) you can find great bassoons by other makers such as Yamaha, Leitzinger, Bell, Wolf, Mollenhauer, Heckel, the ones listed above and probably others I've forgotten.

As far as how you pay for it, most places, especially if you buy used, want you to pay for the whole thing up front, so you (meaning, your parents) will likely need to take out a loan depending on how much money they have laying around.  That's just something to take up with your bank or financial consultant if your family has such a thing.  Some of the bigger resellers may have a finance plan, but I'd think you'd get a better deal with a line of credit or something through your bank.  Talk to your parents about these things.

M.M.A., D.M.A. University of Illinois at Urbana/Champaign: B.Mus. Lawrence University
Bassoon professor at University of Wisconsin Eau-Claire
Maker of the Little-Jake electric bassoon pickup and Weasel bassoon reeds

Re: Bassoon brands

Trent has given you great advice.  I'd look no further for a second opinion.  You can find all three of these brands by googling them.  There's lots of information to absorb.

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Re: Bassoon brands

Thanks for the info i knew heckel is THE best brand but also THE most expensive so I dident ask.my bassoon teachers bassoon is a heckel it sounds soooooooo beautifull. i now have a school horn i think its a amati or something close to it. would amati be a good buy? at least until i get enough moneyror a fox after i finish collge? thanks for shedding some light on this.




Mr Bassoon 9th grade bassooniest


p.s. maybe i'll win the lottery    $4000  yikes !!!!!!!!

Last edited by Mr Bassoon (2007-10-05 19:13:20)

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Re: Bassoon brands

Hello All:


         Trents info is pretty much the concrete facts. If you are going to play bassoon in college you need to be looking at a Moosmann 98a or 100a, or a Renard 222d, 220 or 240. Amati and Adler are not an acceptable instrument by most teachers. Best case scenario is that if you may need to try to get a student loan when you go off to school to buy an instrument, or use an instrument that the university can provide you.

      The Amati and Adler are indeed lesser in cost but they are also substantially lesser in quality and design. While it seems cheaper immediately to buy one of those brands. I can assure you without a doubt that you will spend alot more money after the initial purchase. These instruments pretty much need to be repadded right off the bat when their new, they keywork is not designed and constructed very well so expect some thing to need adjustment in that area, and expect the tuning of the scale to be very whacky. By the time all is said and done you have spend another 1500-2000 dollars in set up and adjustments for a bassoon that will at best play ok but not even come close to surpassing the playing qualities of a Moosmann or Renard.   Another thing I will state is that while some general music stores will work on Amati's and Adlers, most bassoon specialists will not. I in particular will not under any circumstance work on an Amati bassoon. Adlers occasionally.They are simply too much work and too inferior in design to take the time to work on them. Bassoons are very unique and need to be serviced by a repair tech that knows how to really work on a bassoon. So keep that in mind in your purchase.

        If you have any questions, or concerns, let me know. I will try to help as best I can.


                                   Best Regards,
                                    Chad Taylor

Taylor Bassoon Services
723 Steamboat Ct
Ottawa, IL 61350
PH-815-343-2492

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Re: Bassoon brands

Thanks. i kinda figured amati would be  a streach but i wanted to know for sure. well i wont really have to wory too much for a nother year or two. I am going to work these next 3 summers to save up extra money for one. is there a consumer reports place for woodwinds?





Mr Bassoon 9th grade bassoon player   smile

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Re: Bassoon brands

Mr Bassoon wrote:

is there a consumer reports place for woodwinds?

You're already there.  wink

M.M.A., D.M.A. University of Illinois at Urbana/Champaign: B.Mus. Lawrence University
Bassoon professor at University of Wisconsin Eau-Claire
Maker of the Little-Jake electric bassoon pickup and Weasel bassoon reeds

Re: Bassoon brands

"Your best bet when looking for a bassoon is to have an experienced professional bassoonist (that has nothing to gain by the sale) help you pick out a bassoon that is right for you." -- Trent


Mr. Bassoon, Trent's statement is definitely good advice.  Although there are a lot of good bassoons, not all of them will be for you.  What some bassoonists don't like, others will.  It's all a matter of personal preference in sound and feel.

But whatever you do, stay away from Laurel, Laval, Maestro and other bassoons that are currently on the market from China.  These instruments have a tendency to be poorly made and your parents will end up investing much more in having the bassoon repaired than what the instrument is worth.

Best wishes to you on your search for a bassoon!

"Music is a moral law.  It gives a soul to the universe, wings to the mind, flight to the imagination, a charm to sadness, gaiety and life to everything  It is the essence of order, and leads to all that is good, just and beautiful."  -- Plato

Re: Bassoon brands

FWIW, for many years I had a Polisi bassoon that was quite serviceable. In fact, I played a world premiere of a concerto on it. Yes, it wasn't great, but it was respectable, and I didn't feel at all bad about selling it to a high school student when I retired and bought a Fox 201. That Polisi was made by Schreiber, and there must surely be some other elderly Schreibers out there that would be reasonable first horns for a student. I also had no trouble finding reputable repairmen to service my Polisi, though I know some people I wouldn't have asked to  work on it.

Charley Wright

Re: Bassoon brands

I played on a Schreiber and i was really pleased with it. i only had it for the summer it was at my bassoon teacher was able to get it from the city symphony and did not have any one to play it. how expencive are Schreibers? and are they a good buy for long term use.

Mr. Bassoon
9th grade bassooniest

P.S. the bassoon i have from the school is a king I think its from chezk. I miss that Schreiber.

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Re: Bassoon brands

I have seen used Schreibers go for $2500 - $3500.  I don't know what they sell for new, though.

"Music is a moral law.  It gives a soul to the universe, wings to the mind, flight to the imagination, a charm to sadness, gaiety and life to everything  It is the essence of order, and leads to all that is good, just and beautiful."  -- Plato

Re: Bassoon brands

if i get a bassoon with a 3rd finger platau key can i take it off because i dont need or have ever used one? or can i just learn to play with it? is it harder to play with one?   

Mr.bassoon
9th grade bassooniest/ 2007 all district honer band member

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Re: Bassoon brands

Hello Again:



      First of all DO NOT take that key off. If this is your own horn and your not happy with the plateau key, what would need to be done is to have it rebuilt into a ring key. This is a fairly simple job for any bassoon tech and can actually be done in a day (if you dont want to have the key plated.) The instrument needs to have that key in order to facilitate proper function of a vent key on the wing joint. What brand of bassoon is this plateau key on? Also, is this a brand new or used bassoon?


                                            Best Regards,
                                             Chad Taylor

Taylor Bassoon Services
723 Steamboat Ct
Ottawa, IL 61350
PH-815-343-2492

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Re: Bassoon brands

The key on the third fingerhole of the wing joint is an essential part of the C#/D# trill key mechanism.  Whether it is a ring key or a plateau key doesn't matter, but it MUST be there.  Without it you're going to get some very strange and unwanted notes.  If someone suggests wedging the Eb vent pad closed then you end up interfering with the functions for which that key is important. 

A plateau key is valuable for anyone with small hands.  Not only does it make the reach for the third finger hole easier, it also makes the reach for a high D key easier.  However, if you don't need accommodation for small hands, and if you find the plateau key uncomfortable, then have it replaced with a ring key.

The C#/D# trill key is a mechanism that is often not understood.  It is an automatic mechanism that functions without our conscious effort.  It was introduced by Heckel in 1880 and quickly became a basic part of every bassoon.  At first it served to produce only the trill for which it is named.  Almost immediately Heckel extended it to improve the response of high B and C.  It remains inactive until either the C# key or the high C key is depressed.  At that point the pad is controlled by the 3rd finger ring/plateau key.  To play the trill, hold the C# key depressed and trill your third finger.  The D# or Eb which is sounded is okay for a trill, but you wouldn't want to use it routinely to play an Eb. 

Chip Owen

Last edited by Chip Owen (2007-12-06 10:42:11)

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Re: Bassoon brands

Mr Bassoon wrote:

if i get a bassoon with a 3rd finger platau key can i take it off because i dont need or have ever used one? or can i just learn to play with it? is it harder to play with one?   

Mr.bassoon
9th grade bassooniest/ 2007 all district honer band member

You'll actually probably find it easier to play with one, although it may feel weird at first.

Ultimately you way want to have it turned into a ring key for sound purposes.  If this ever becomes the case, please refer to Chad's post about it.

M.M.A., D.M.A. University of Illinois at Urbana/Champaign: B.Mus. Lawrence University
Bassoon professor at University of Wisconsin Eau-Claire
Maker of the Little-Jake electric bassoon pickup and Weasel bassoon reeds

Re: Bassoon brands

the model is the renard 222d and its new. if i have the platau key changed to aring then who should do the oreration? should i take it back to the factory? and what would be the cost?

Mr.bassoon
9th geade bassoonist/2007district honer band

P.S. thank you all this advice you guys are awsome smile

Last edited by Mr Bassoon (2007-12-07 16:43:05)

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Re: Bassoon brands

Hello:




       If its brand new and under warranty, I would contact Chip Owen out at Fox and discuss that with him. Chip is a fantastic bassoon tech and is responsible for the Fox contrabassoons, and a majority of other production items at the factory (Chip, what would the bassoon tech and making world do without you!!). I am not sure what kind of offer Fox can offer you on key modifications. If they can't, I can easily do the conversion myself. Contact Fox first, if there is any problem, you may contact me at my info below.


                                            Best Regards,
                                             Chad Taylor

Taylor Bassoon Services
723 Steamboat Ct
Ottawa, IL 61350
PH-815-343-2492

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Re: Bassoon brands

Is it possible to play high d with out a high d key? or high e without a high e key ?
i have a fealing that you cant. how often do you need too i have only seen high d  a copple of times and i have not needed to play them...yet!

MR.Bassoon 
bassoon/alto saxaphone

Last edited by Mr Bassoon (2008-01-12 21:22:47)

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Re: Bassoon brands

Hi Mr. Bassoon. 

Although not ideal, I can play a high D with the C key instead of the high D key.  A good fingering for high E without the high E key is left hand C# key  1/2 X X   right hand  X X X     I hope that is clear.  Experiment with the size of the 1/2 hole.  It can be critical.  Kent

Dr. Kent Moore
Principal Lecturer In Bassoon and Theory
Northern Arizona University