Topic: new bocals

Prof. Grundmann of Dresden University, a professor of aerospace whose expertise is in airflow and happens to be a bassoonist, has designed a totally new bocal shape ( as shown in a recent IDRS Journal).  So far Wolf is the only maker making these bocals.  I have a few of them in different metals and thicknesses.  For me they have significant advantages over standard bocals, especially in intervals.  The down slurs are far easier and clearer for me.    Arthur Grossman   artbsn@comcast.net

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Re: new bocals

What method do you use in looking for a bocal? Do you judge by the maker, the letters stamped on it, the material, whether it is a prewar bocal no matter how it plays? How do you test a bocal and decide to buy it? Does it have to be a new one? What qualities must it have?
Suppose it has been rejected by another player. Would you consider it?
Norman Herzberg   nherzberg@pacbell.net

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Re: new bocals

I do not judge by the maker, or the numbers or letters stamped on the bocal.  I would certainly consider used bocals. I judge bocals by a. the sound quality on the bassoon on which I am trying them b. the intonation, not only the general tuning and whether it is at 440, but especially intervals, octaves being the first check and then other intervals c. ease of slurring intervals, down as well as up.  If all of these criteria pass the test, then there is the question of feel, i.e. comfort in playing on that particular bocal.

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