Topic: double radius gouge

Okay a not so random thought:

What is the purpose of the double radius gouge? What does it improve over the assumed original "single" radius gouge?  How can you tell whether or not a piece of cane was gouged with either machine?

Richard

"Creative problem-solving usually requires both analysis and sudden out-of-the-box insight."

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Re: double radius gouge

Good Morning Richard,

Forgive my ignorance but what exactly is a double radius gouge, I am not familiar with that term or its meaning. I am used to gouging using a gouging bed (in my case on a reeds-n-stuff gouger) but I presume that only gouges in a "single" way...I spend a fair amount of time with two professional reed makers and I have never heard them talk about a double radius gouge..you have my curiosity

I await in great anticipation.

regards

Andrew

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Re: double radius gouge

A double radius gouge is where the gouging blade is offset to one side so the user has to flip the cane ever five or so strokes. The benefit of this is having a more uniform gouge and the ability to change side thickness easier. There are no real tell-tale signs looking at a piece of cane that shows which method was used. Graf/Ferrillo machines are double radius gougers. Ross and I believe RDG machines are single radius gougers.

Re: double radius gouge

So, then do the single radius gougers have no side-to-side adjustments to change the side thickness?  I have 2 graf gougers and have never had any other type so I don't know how they work.  And do the Ross/RDG machines require a blade that is shaped perfectly symetrical so that the cane is not flipped around to make the final contour even?

Do you notice real differences in the reed?  Does one type help say response, dynamics, etc... better then the other?

Was Tabuteau's gouger a single or double radius type?  What qualities about it would cause him to say that the gouge is more important than the 'grattage' (scrape)?

Richard

"Creative problem-solving usually requires both analysis and sudden out-of-the-box insight."

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Re: double radius gouge

The Ross/RDG machines don't need the cane to be flipped around. Some people still do it though, just to make sure.

I don't know about Tabuteau's gouging philosophy. Regardless, I think we all can agree that gouge is extremely important.

You've opened a can of worms really. Many people have different theories about which is better and why. I hope other people chime in with their thoughts.

Re: double radius gouge

Tabuteau used Graf machines, as did his students. On the front cover of Laila Storch's book, Tabuteau is staring down the guide of a Graf machine.

In her book, she describes Tabuteau making reeds for as many as 10 hours a day, constantly grinding the Graf blade to be a different curve. He was always looking for something better.