Topic: Hand Gouging?

Can anyone give me any information about hand gouging bassoon cane? All I know is that the primary tools I should have are a paring gouge and a rubber hammer. Other than that, I am clueless. I am really looking to learn this skill because there is no way I can afford a gouging machine. Can anyone give me any resources for techniques and tools? Thanks.

Phil
New York

Share

Re: Hand Gouging?

Phil, Please consider purchasing gouged cane. There's a lot of good quality gouged cane on the market. Best wishes, Christopher Weait

Christopher Weait,
Principal bassoon, Toronto Symphony (1968 - 1985)
IDRS Honorary Member; Emeritus professor Ohio State University
www.weaitmusic.com

Re: Hand Gouging?

Phil,

If you're doing it for financial reasons, go with Chris Weait's advice and buy pre-gouged cane.  It's worth the price and hassle.

However, if you are intrigued about the whole process (from cutting the cane in the field to finishing the reed), there was a nice article in the DR about hand gouging, which explains the process very well.  I don't have my issues with me now, but perhaps someone else knows of this article and can mention the issue where it was published.  Apparently, while the gouging machine offers consistency, the hand gouge offers the ability to alter the gouge for each piece of cane. 

I've been experimenting with alternative tools for gouging.  Once I get proficient, I'll post my findings, but you can get an excellent gouge with about $150 investment.  If you can visit a local woodworking store (Rockler in Dallas/Ft Worth is excellent) and take the cane with you for explanation, they may have some good suggestions for gouging the cane. 

Good luck,

Scott

Scott Pool

"The Ornaments look pretty, but they're pulling down the branches of the tree." - Cake

Re: Hand Gouging?

Bassoon reeds were hand gouged for most of history.  Older style reeds were gouged closer to the rind so were harder and lasted longer, so the endless need to make new reeds was not so pressing. There are pictures available of gouging beds which are just a piece of wood with a stop to rest the cane against and a wide groove the diameter of the cane piece to hold it in.  The gouge should be a good quality woodworking gouge of appropriate diameter.  Some sort of gauge to judge thicknesses is needed too. There is a lot more information out there for hand gouging, with a bit of searching.

Share

Re: Hand Gouging?

Try Leslie Ross, she has some reed-making tools for "authentic" reeds

www.leslieross.net



- Hubbe

Share