Topic: Beveling and the fulcrum

I've been looking through this forum and have noticed beveling come up a couple of times. One of my old teachers mentioned it to me, but I never really understood what it was. So basically my questions come down to these:
1. What is the purpose of beveling?
2. Is it necessary, or does it really make a difference?
3. Where can I learn more about beveling?
4. What's this fulcrum of the reed that seems to be mentioned a lot with beveling?

Any answers or points in the right direction would be greatly appreciated. Thank you

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Re: Beveling and the fulcrum

There was a great article in The Double Reed about 5 years ago called "The Magic of Little Splinters" or something to that effect. Check the IDRS archives for the article, sorry I don't know exactly where it is or what it's called. Talked about different bevels, how they change the reed, when to use them and why.

I find most people bevel, but they don't really know why. ;-)

M.M.A., D.M.A. University of Illinois at Urbana/Champaign: B.Mus. Lawrence University
Bassoon professor at University of Wisconsin Eau-Claire
Maker of the Little-Jake electric bassoon pickup and Weasel bassoon reeds

Re: Beveling and the fulcrum

I used to NOT bevel, and my reeds would not stay as opened as I would wish in a heavy performance. I have to say that after I have been doing this the last 15 to 20 years, the reeds always are the right opening after I have broken them in. There really is something to this, and I would encourage you to try it. The reason is simple. When you are controlling your reed in soft dynamics or in extreme registers you need some oposition to your damping with your lips. In reality a reed actually closes completely when you are putting air through it. If there is no "spring" or insufficient "spring" it will tend to want to close too much, or will completely shut down. This will affect your low register response as well as your ease of articulation.

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Re: Beveling and the fulcrum

The combination of the bevel, wire placement and tension, and the scrape (wedge, parallel, modified parallel) determine the size and the resilience of the reed aperture.

Here is the link to the video of "The official Herzberg bevel," which explains the method for the bevel and its effect on the reed opening.

https://www.idrs.org/multimedia/video/b … -recid=827

Yoshi Ishikawa
Professor of Bassoon, University of Colorado at Boulder, College of Music
Editor, IDRS OnLine Publications

Re: Beveling and the fulcrum

That video changed my life. :-)

M.M.A., D.M.A. University of Illinois at Urbana/Champaign: B.Mus. Lawrence University
Bassoon professor at University of Wisconsin Eau-Claire
Maker of the Little-Jake electric bassoon pickup and Weasel bassoon reeds

Re: Beveling and the fulcrum

Abe Weiss's reedmaking DVD has a section on beveling. I recommend it highly.

Christopher Brodersen
Maker of Historical Keyboard Instruments
Reviewer/contributor - Fanfare Magazine
Amateur bassoonist, baroque oboist, baroque bassoonist

Re: Beveling and the fulcrum

Another excellent resource for beveling is available at:
http://diginole.lib.fsu.edu/cgi/viewcon … ontext=etd

This is the dissertation : The Teachings Methods of Lewis Hugh Cooper
Matthew Blane Morris
Florida State University

I use the last type of bevel shown on page 47, Figure 3.5, my variant being that you start the bevel at
a 45 degree bevel just inside the first wire, that is on the butt side and gradually move to a 30 degree
bevel as you progress toward the butt. You reach the 30 degree bevel about half way down the bevel.
In this manner you have a larger tube in the throat area. I set the tip opening with the mandrel that I use so
that adjustment of the fulcrum is not so much to change the tip opening as it is to effect the throat shape.

Dale Clark

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Re: Beveling and the fulcrum

Thanks for all the help. I'm trying it out to see what works best for me.

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Re: Beveling and the fulcrum

Thank you, Mr. Brodersen.   

My dvd is available at:
abesbassoonreeds.com
millermarketingco.com
trevcomusic.com
charlesmusic.com

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Re: Beveling and the fulcrum

You're entirely welcome, Abe--it's a great video.

BTW, call me Chris--we've chatted several times at IDRS conferences!

Christopher Brodersen
Maker of Historical Keyboard Instruments
Reviewer/contributor - Fanfare Magazine
Amateur bassoonist, baroque oboist, baroque bassoonist