Topic: Explaining oboe embouchre

I am starting my first student, and we hit a slight dead end at our first lesson.  I am having trouble explaining oboe embouchure and mouth shape.  She has been playing clarinet for 4 years, and I would like to be able to compare things to playing clarinet.  I would love any suggestions related to teaching a beginner that people are willing to share.

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Re: Explaining oboe embouchre

Try this link (English): http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=hHB44a0K1Io
Cantonese:http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Xi4gEEmIXbo

Yoshi Ishikawa
Professor of Bassoon, U of Colorado at Boulder
Editor, IDRS OnLine Publications
Administrator, IDRS Forum

Re: Explaining oboe embouchre

One of my professors always said the oboe embouchre looks like the south end of a northbound cat. Don't know if that's useful, but at the very least, it might make you laugh. smile

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Re: Explaining oboe embouchre

The explanation that worked best for me was a combo of these 2 things: A.) Think of speaking French; everything is down and forward. B.) Use the "walrus tusks" to pull the upper lip down and cover (it does all the work, while the lower lip is the foundation for the reed). It might feel a bit like you've lost total control, but it forces you to blow waaay more and focus on your air vs. biting and all the other side-effects of embouchure. Hope that all makes sense/helps!!

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Re: Explaining oboe embouchre

act like you're puckering up to kiss someone, then roll the lips under -- and the lips should be used as a pillow for the reed, never to bite or squeeze.  I also like to ask them to imagine holding a golf ball in their mouth (to get the jaw down).

Last edited by oboe1960 (2013-06-20 18:22:47)

Darlene

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Re: Explaining oboe embouchre

Great ideas for bassoon too, great link, thanks!
Steve

Principal bassoonist, Orquesta Sinfonica de Galicia, A Coruña, Spain. Bassoonist, bassoon dad, bassoon husband, bassoon uncle, bassoon brother and bassoon son.

Re: Explaining oboe embouchre

cnwheel wrote:

The explanation that worked best for me was a combo of these 2 things: A.) Think of speaking French; everything is down and forward. B.) Use the "walrus tusks" to pull the upper lip down and cover (it does all the work, while the lower lip is the foundation for the reed). It might feel a bit like you've lost total control, but it forces you to blow waaay more and focus on your air vs. biting and all the other side-effects of embouchure. Hope that all makes sense/helps!!

For people who don't speak French, listen to a person from India speaking English, then imitate that accent.  It comes out to the same thing.

Bassoonist Ordinaire, all around nice guy.
If anyone needs a damn fool, I'm your man!

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