Topic: YARMV (Yet Another Reed Making Video) but with a bit of a twist

So I made a video of me making a reed, from beginning (I buy gouged) all the way through the finishing process until I consider the reed "done" and ready for sale.

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=smanwe3_hY8

This video has me narrating over the video, describing what I am doing and what some of my rationalizations are. It's not a How-To guide.

If you don't have 32 minutes to spare, here is the same video but sped up to 4x speed. Set to music from a band that I used to play in.

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=hmOhIcBgHV0


(I've been spamming this all over the place, so sorry if you've seen me post about this already somewhere else)

M.M.A., D.M.A. University of Illinois at Urbana/Champaign: B.Mus. Lawrence University
Bassoon professor at University of Wisconsin Eau-Claire
Maker of the Little-Jake electric bassoon pickup and Weasel bassoon reeds

Re: YARMV (Yet Another Reed Making Video) but with a bit of a twist

Thanks Trent and congratulations on post 1000 smile

Dr. Kent Moore
Principal Lecturer In Bassoon and Theory
Northern Arizona University

Re: YARMV (Yet Another Reed Making Video) but with a bit of a twist

Figured I'd do something special for it. :-)

M.M.A., D.M.A. University of Illinois at Urbana/Champaign: B.Mus. Lawrence University
Bassoon professor at University of Wisconsin Eau-Claire
Maker of the Little-Jake electric bassoon pickup and Weasel bassoon reeds

Re: YARMV (Yet Another Reed Making Video) but with a bit of a twist

Nice job.  I just finished it and enjoyed it.

Dr. Kent Moore
Principal Lecturer In Bassoon and Theory
Northern Arizona University

Re: YARMV (Yet Another Reed Making Video) but with a bit of a twist

Trent..Your video has inspired me to try something new.  I've been in sort of a reed funk lately...reeds have been coming out very dead sounding, flat Es, no resonance, no brilliance at all.  After viewing your video a couple times, I decided to try something different.  I tried using your forming method of soaking, scoring, wrapping with cotton thread and inserting long mandrel and letting dry without putting on wires, THEN unfolding and bevelling the tube with sandpaper on a sanding block, and then applying wires dry.  For years I bevelled with a knife prior to forming, wrapped soaked blank with butchers twine, inserted long mandrel, then replaced with short mandrel and put wires on while wet.  Then tightened wires several times before applying wrapping (I have used Hot Glue for years).  New results have been very positive :-)!  My reeds have begun to sing again, very resonant and brilliant.  Pitch seems fine and I love the way these reeds play!  I use a Popkin Profiler (old, from 1987) and have not used my Rieger Tip Profiler on these latest reeds, just finishing with some sanding in the wings and along the spine. Thanks for inspiring this old fart to try something new....it may be just the newness of it, but I'll keep trying your method for a while (at least until I start producing dead reeds agan LOL)

Frank Watson
Greenville (SC) Symphony Orchestra
Spartanburg Philharmonic Orchestra
Converse College Petrie School of Music

Share

Re: YARMV (Yet Another Reed Making Video) but with a bit of a twist

That method was inspired by seeing a video that Yoshi posted here several years ago. It was of Norman Herzberg demonstrating his beveling technique to Yoshi's students at UC Boulder. That video pretty much changed my life. :-)

M.M.A., D.M.A. University of Illinois at Urbana/Champaign: B.Mus. Lawrence University
Bassoon professor at University of Wisconsin Eau-Claire
Maker of the Little-Jake electric bassoon pickup and Weasel bassoon reeds

Re: YARMV (Yet Another Reed Making Video) but with a bit of a twist

Trent..I've been aware of, but not into, Herzberg's bevelling method for quite some time.  I guess I should ascribe my recent reed success to that particular aspect of "your" method, although I'm actually thinking it's merely the action of changing something in the process rather than a specific act that's causing my reeds to have changed.  I liken it to changing Putters for a golfer..invariably there is a period of improvement, followed by a revert to normal outcomes after the "honeymoon" is over with the new wand.  Just my thoughts...thanks, again, for posting your video showing your process.  I'll certainly assign viewing it to my students as they learn reedmaking.

-Frank

Share

Re: YARMV (Yet Another Reed Making Video) but with a bit of a twist

Hey Trent,
I just started watching your video, it looks great! I had an idea about that "flare" of cane on the profiler. In the video you have an adjustment screw on the upper left of the profiler to adjust the length of the profile. If you unscrew that double adjustment screw a tiny bit ( maybe .1 mm), you can create a slight overlap to shave off the flare. ( one screw is a screw to lock the adjustment screw in place). You don't want too much or you can scratch the barrel, just enough to cut the fuzz off the middle, and it can leave a nice line in the middle. I have actually adjusted the right screw on my profiler to create a longer or shorter tube.  ( I make reeds with both 28mm and 30mm tubes), a bassoon reed you can cut the tube down to your desired length afterward,( i see you do that anyway). I experimented with a shorter tube, narrower reed also, no trimming necessary if you want to avoid it. Lots of options with one shape. I have a single barrel profiler too, my dad has a double barrel and the advantage of a double barrel is like a key copier. You can basically copy a profile of a finished reed, something like that.
Best- Steve

Principal bassoonist, Orquesta Sinfonica de Galicia, A Coruña, Spain. Bassoonist, bassoon dad, bassoon husband, bassoon uncle, bassoon brother and bassoon son.

Re: YARMV (Yet Another Reed Making Video) but with a bit of a twist

Steve,
I did have to adjust those screws on the profiler when I first got it. I think I do have it passing beyond the center point of the reed just slightly. The cane comes off rather easily, it just doesn't appear that way in the video. It matters how much pressure I put on the cane on the early profiling stages as well: if I press too hard the flared/curled cane doesn't come off as well, because on the second pass on the other side won't be able to cut as deeply. If I let the profiler take a bit less cane off of each pass, the whole process requires much less effort and is "cleaner". It does require a few more flips of the barrel though.

M.M.A., D.M.A. University of Illinois at Urbana/Champaign: B.Mus. Lawrence University
Bassoon professor at University of Wisconsin Eau-Claire
Maker of the Little-Jake electric bassoon pickup and Weasel bassoon reeds

Re: YARMV (Yet Another Reed Making Video) but with a bit of a twist

You are fine then, it's good you do it in multiple stages too, it keeps you from gouging holes in the cane. Nice video, your exacting attitude has rubbed off on me too, I have been getting some really nice reeds inspired by you, thanks!
Steve

Principal bassoonist, Orquesta Sinfonica de Galicia, A Coruña, Spain. Bassoonist, bassoon dad, bassoon husband, bassoon uncle, bassoon brother and bassoon son.

Re: YARMV (Yet Another Reed Making Video) but with a bit of a twist

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=d_Zm63PYUQw
abesbassoonreeds.com

Share

Re: YARMV (Yet Another Reed Making Video) but with a bit of a twist

I noticed you left some parts out, Abe. ;-)

What profiling machines are you using? MD and something else for stage two, yeah?

M.M.A., D.M.A. University of Illinois at Urbana/Champaign: B.Mus. Lawrence University
Bassoon professor at University of Wisconsin Eau-Claire
Maker of the Little-Jake electric bassoon pickup and Weasel bassoon reeds

Re: YARMV (Yet Another Reed Making Video) but with a bit of a twist

I think Abe makes an excellent point on the rotating reeds post by the way, making reeds is like practicing, I'm better if I am doing something with reed making every day. Like high notes, tonguing or technique, if you don't work on it, it doesn't get better and it can get worse.

Back to this post. Thanks for the video link Abe, I use a tap for scoring and am destroying my wood dowel, I like what you do in the video, much better. What are the two profilers, by the way? The first maybe a Pfeiffer and the second the Herzberg? Do you use the first profiler to save on the blade of the second or are there two angles involved?What is the benefit of the throat reamer? More lower harmonics? I'll stop, nice video, cheers-Steve

Principal bassoonist, Orquesta Sinfonica de Galicia, A Coruña, Spain. Bassoonist, bassoon dad, bassoon husband, bassoon uncle, bassoon brother and bassoon son.

Re: YARMV (Yet Another Reed Making Video) but with a bit of a twist

I also wonder what profilers they are, but I can answer the second question about them, since Abe told me his strategy here. One profiler does the back and is a straighter taper to the tip. The second one is set up to do the ramp at the tip. So basically he has the second one set up as a tip profiler, of sorts.

It's something you can mostly accomplish on some profilers (Reeds 'n' Stuff or a double-barrel style).

I'm sure Abe will correct me on this, but I notice he's only active on here every so often, so I thought I'd chime in.

M.M.A., D.M.A. University of Illinois at Urbana/Champaign: B.Mus. Lawrence University
Bassoon professor at University of Wisconsin Eau-Claire
Maker of the Little-Jake electric bassoon pickup and Weasel bassoon reeds

Re: YARMV (Yet Another Reed Making Video) but with a bit of a twist

i use a Pfeiffer single barrel profiler to start the job.  I adapted it to accept the cane barrel from the Herzberg machine so I do not need to move the cane from one barrel to another.   It cuts the collar exactly where I want it.   It also removes most of the cane so there is very little left to do with the Herzberg machines.   The blades on the Herzberg machines are set differently than the Pfeiffer.   They take off very little cane, which adds to the accuracy of the final cut.   But that can be slow.   
Then I profile the back with a Herzberg machine set to .036 inch at the collar with a gentile taper to the tip.  I use the "B" cam which has a narrow heart and an aggressive taper from the spine to the sides.     This leaves the cane very thick in the tip half of the reed. Then I profile on my second Herzberg profiler.   It is set very thick at the back with a much steeper taper to the tip.   The blade does not engage the cane until 7/16 inch from where I will ultimately clip the tip.   I use the "A" cam, which has a gentile taper from the spine to the sides.

Share