Topic: A good replacement for cork?

Hello Double Reed World.  We are currently in a session all about the IDRS at UT-Arlington's Double Reed Day.  We have a question!

Is there a good replacement for cork on the bassoon?

Thanks for your answers...

Scott Pool

"The Ornaments look pretty, but they're pulling down the branches of the tree." - Cake

Re: A good replacement for cork?

What do you think of this?  http://www.oboetube.com/bassoonboost/techdetail.htm 

I didn't read this yet but more info  http://www.idrs.org/IDRSBBS/viewtopic.php?id=107

Dr. Kent Moore
Principal Lecturer In Bassoon and Theory
Northern Arizona University

Re: A good replacement for cork?

I used a Bassoon Boost on my bocal for a few years. Got kind of annoyed by the fit of the o-rings, and how they would slip off the bocal. When I switched back to cork I didn't really notice much of a difference. A little scrape out of the heart of your reed does more to the sound.

M.M.A., D.M.A. University of Illinois at Urbana/Champaign: B.Mus. Lawrence University
Bassoon professor at University of Wisconsin Eau-Claire
Maker of the Little-Jake electric bassoon pickup and Weasel bassoon reeds

Re: A good replacement for cork?

I like the staples made by Tomas (the oboetube.com site mentioned above). Yes, I have learned to be careful with the sealing (bottom) ring in particular (it tends to come off, but pretty much only during tying on a blank), but I do like it once you figure out the fit for the instrument you are making reeds for. What I like, though, over other corkless staple alternatives doesn't apply to the bassoon world (I can use any kind of staple I want and get the corkless benefit).

I have made one attempt to use the English horn equivalent of the Bassoon Boost, but botched the installation and haven't tried again.

I would like to try the technology on the really odd instruments like the musette (anything that might help the reeds!) and on the bass oboe (the cork on the Hiniker bocal needs to be really thick, otherwise, to fit the receiver, and that's hard to get cork thick enough yet flexible enough to be wrapped around the bocal), but, alas, nothing exists for those instruments.

I'm not totally convinced on the auditory benefits—getting reeds consistent enough to be sure it's really the staple isn't something I  can do yet; individual reed variation seems a much bigger factor. But I'm not saying any sonic effects are entirely bogus, either; I'm just not good enough yet to have a definitive opinion.-kby

Last edited by kby (2014-02-25 01:37:36)

Share

Re: A good replacement for cork?

I assume this discussion is about the cork on bassoon bocals. I have found the yellow waxed hemp used by bagpipers to be useful, and have not noticed any significant sonic changes. I've also found that if the cork is too small, plumbers' tape does the trick.

David Bell
Alexandria, VA

David Bell
Alexandria, VA
amateur bassoon and contra bassoon

Share