Topic: Reed Geek

Hi all,
I have been seeing several people using the "Reed Geek" tool. Mainly single reeds...but have been hearing some buzz about use with double reeds. Anyone use them? What are your experiences with oboe and bassoon using it?

Thanks,

Shawn

Shawn Reynolds
Professor of Oboe/EH - Youngstown State University
Howland Schools - MS (director of bands); HS (Asst. Dir of Bands, Marching, Symphonic)

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Re: Reed Geek

I personally haven’t tried it, but someone I very occasionally play with (also oboe) recommended it. They said they liked something that never needed sharpening and was always ready. I looked at the one they had, then did some reading. It does seem like it's made for single reeds more than double and that double reeds is kind of an "off-label" use. I would guess it would work better for bassoon family reeds rather than oboe family reeds, mainly because it doesn't seem that the scraping is as delicate and nuanced (to me) for those.

I kind of decided it was kind of pricey and didn't really do what I want to do with my reeds these days. I have serious doubts about the "not needing sharpening" thing, and it looks mostly like a square bar of metal with sharp corners. It's also quite small so portable, but you'd hold it more like you hold reed rush. It might be good as a substitute for that, but I generally don't use that any more except in rare circumstances. I might like it better if I was more comfortable with a bevel knife, but I'm not.
-kby

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Re: Reed Geek

Oboehotty wrote:

Hi all,
I have been seeing several people using the "Reed Geek" tool. Mainly single reeds...but have been hearing some buzz about use with double reeds. Anyone use them? What are your experiences with oboe and bassoon using it?

Thanks,

Shawn

I have one, and I find the rounded tip of the Reed Geek very helpful for making 'windows' on an oboe reed, and also for scraping in the channels on a bassoon reed. The beauty of this device is the control--you can use it to take off a lot or the tiniest amount, depending on how you use it. The trick, which the guy showed me at last year's conference, it to use it like the eraser on a pencil to kind of 'scrub off' material.

I use the rounded end or tip exclusively--the flat edges along the length of the tool are intended for clarinet or sax and don't really lend themselves to double reeds. My only complaint is that the manufacturer should have provided a second rounded tip at the opposite end. Instead, it's just cut off square.

Christopher Brodersen
Maker of Historical Keyboard Instruments
Reviewer/contributor - Fanfare Magazine
Amateur bassoonist, baroque oboist, baroque bassoonist

Re: Reed Geek

Hi Christopher,

Does it stay sharp for a long time on the rounded tip.  Have you sharpened it and is that easy to do. 

Thanks, Kent

Dr. Kent Moore
Principal Lecturer In Bassoon and Theory
Northern Arizona University

Re: Reed Geek

Kent -

So far it's stayed pretty sharp--haven't sharpened it yet. I don't think I'll try, since it's a special machined finish, and I'd probably ruin it. Seem to remember, though, that the manufacturer will re-sharpen at NC.

BTW, Miller Marketing sells these things. I'll probably contact Justin when the time comes.

Christopher Brodersen
Maker of Historical Keyboard Instruments
Reviewer/contributor - Fanfare Magazine
Amateur bassoonist, baroque oboist, baroque bassoonist

Re: Reed Geek

Thanks Christopher.  I may try one.  I use curved exacto blades to get into the channels but they don't last long.

Dr. Kent Moore
Principal Lecturer In Bassoon and Theory
Northern Arizona University