Topic: Methods for advanced MS/HS oboists

Hi Everyone,
I'm looking for some new ideas for some of my students who are advanced Middle School and Intermediate HS students. They seem to loose interest really quickly in the Barrett. I want something not quite as "in depth" but that will start to help develop their skills. Any thoughts?

Gekeler is OK, but I want something different. Thoughts?

Shawn

Shawn Reynolds
Professor of Oboe/EH - Youngstown State University
Howland Schools - MS (director of bands); HS (Asst. Dir of Bands, Marching, Symphonic)

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Re: Methods for advanced MS/HS oboists

I should clarify -- I'm not using Barret for the MS student...only the High School student. She hates it! I dont' want her to loose interest. Ferling is an option, but thought I would see if there are newer things out there that are more interesting.  The MS student is currently using Gekeler 2 but is getting really bored and wants something a little more interesting.

I tend to play a lot of duets with my students for ear training, etc. So, duet books are also appreciated.

Shawn

Shawn Reynolds
Professor of Oboe/EH - Youngstown State University
Howland Schools - MS (director of bands); HS (Asst. Dir of Bands, Marching, Symphonic)

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Re: Methods for advanced MS/HS oboists

Shawn, it seems you haven't had any replies to this very pertinent query; I'll venture a reply to keep the dialogue going. I believe far too many oboe instructors teach the way they were taught, and so we (over)use Gekeler, Barret and Ferling etudes in the studio. One recent innovative alternative was developed by my former student Linwood "Chip" Zoller as part of his doctoral dissertation requirement at Louisiana State University. He began this line of inquiry when we were both at the University of Georgia (jump in if you read this, Chip.) The monograph is now free online at http://etd.lsu.edu/docs/available/etd-11112011-090013/ and takes 13 fine etudes from under-represented method books written during the period of common practice to develop a new edited compilation.

You may also wish to have students compose or arrange their own music. This may develop other relevant skills and be an engaging exercise.

-best wishes,
Dwight

Last edited by Dwight Manning (2014-08-27 18:21:47)

Dr. Dwight Manning
Teachers College, Columbia University
Box 97 525 West 120th St. New York, NY 10027
212-678-8252  <dm2723@tc.columbia.edu>