Topic: Challenging band program!

from the L A Monitor (online)

http://www.lamonitor.com/articles/2005/04/18/features/features01.txt

Monday, April 18, 2005
Features
Concert to feature music from Disney favorite
KELLY LeVAN, lacommunity@lamonitor.com, Monitor Community Editor

What began as an idea for an animated short has led to more than 60 years of cultural recognition.
Walt Disney's film "Fantasia," originally slated to include only animation and music for Paul Dukas' "The Sorcerer's Apprentice," will live on next weekend as the Los Alamos Community Winds feature the film's well known and much loved soundtrack in the band's upcoming concert.

"Fantasia - Los Alamos" will be held at 7 p.m. Saturday at the Betty Ehart Senior Center. Like all Winds performances, it will be free of charge.
"The concert is sort of a present to my son," said Winds director and founder Ted Vives, referring to his 3-year-old, Alex. "We're hoping the show will have a lot of family appeal."

Alan Hurd, Winds member since 2001, echoed the sentiment. "It's very accessible music," he said. "The theme is so popular and we hope kids of all ages who are familiar with the film will find the music familiar as well."
The program contains such favorites as J.S. Toccata and Fugue in D Minor, Igor Stravinsky's "The Rite of Spring," Amilcare Ponchielli's "Dance of the Hours from "La Gioconda," Modest Mussorgsky's "A Night on Bald Mountain, Ludwig van Beethoven's Symphony No. 6 in F Major (Pastoral) and, of course, "The Sorcerer's Apprentice."

While the pieces in "Fantasia" are almost universally recognized, playing them can test even the most dedicated musician.
"It's quite challenging music for us," Hurd said. "This is serious orchestral music for a wind ensemble and (playing it in a group) is an opportunity you don't often find in a community this size."

Hurd said the real star of the show is bassoonist Loretta Barker. who is "tackling two or three of the defining moments of bassoon literature."

Barker, a Winds member since 2002, said "The Rite of Spring" and "The Sorcerer's Apprentice" are standard solos a bassoonist will practice when learning the instrument.

To present the pieces in a community concert, she said, is "very challenging and very exciting."

She complimented the entire group on its ability to pull such a concert together.

"The band has grown immensely in terms of musical ability," she said. "It's terrific - especially for a group of volunteers. It's a real testament to life-long learning."

Barker is also a member of the Los Alamos Symphony Orchestra and offers private bassoon lessons for local students.

The Winds will not show the video of "Fantasia" in conjunction with the concert. Hurd recommended watching the film before attending the concert to reacquaint oneself with Disney's interpretation of the music.

The Philadelphia Orchestra, conducted by Leopold Stokowski, played the music for the Disney film.

Paul Barrett
   -Principal Bassoonist, Honolulu Symphony
    -Lecturer in Bassoon, University of Hawaii