Topic: Beethoven 4th symphony, MVT IV 'Dolce'

Just trying to take a quick survey here:

Beethoven Symphony 4, Mvt IV 'dolce' solo:

Double tongue or single tongue? What do you all use out there?


Philip
NYC

Last edited by phmurphy (2014-12-09 10:19:44)

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Re: Beethoven 4th symphony, MVT IV 'Dolce'

Did you mean "Beethoven Symphony 4, Mvt IV 'dolce' solo"?

Christopher Weait,
Principal bassoon, Toronto Symphony (1968 - 1985)
IDRS Honorary Member; Emeritus professor Ohio State University
www.weaitmusic.com

Re: Beethoven 4th symphony, MVT IV 'Dolce'

If you mean 4th movement, I double tongue. Technically I can condition my tongue to single that one, but it requires so much diligent maintenance of my tonguing speed that it's just not worth it when my bigger issue isn't even the tongue speed for that excerpt... I also double the arpeggio 3/8 excerpt in Berlioz's symphonie phantastique.

M.M.A., D.M.A. University of Illinois at Urbana/Champaign: B.Mus. Lawrence University
Bassoon professor at University of Wisconsin Eau-Claire
Maker of the Little-Jake electric bassoon pickup and Weasel bassoon reeds

Re: Beethoven 4th symphony, MVT IV 'Dolce'

Indeed, Mvt IV. Trent, for Berlioz, I find it the perfect opportunity to use TKTT...that's a fun one.

Philip

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Re: Beethoven 4th symphony, MVT IV 'Dolce'

There is a detailed work up routine for that famous excerpt in my book "Bassoon Strategies for the Next level". Sub-titled "26 Notes to Glory" on page 163.

Christopher Weait,
Principal bassoon, Toronto Symphony (1968 - 1985)
IDRS Honorary Member; Emeritus professor Ohio State University
www.weaitmusic.com

Re: Beethoven 4th symphony, MVT IV 'Dolce'

My one complaint is the second solo 16th note entrance of the bassoon in the 4th movement, that starts on the F, double tongued, it is most often quite flat. When my students are preparing excerpts for auditions I tell them they can really stand out by playing the exerpts that we normally let slip by, in tune. I lift my right hand index finger for the F, it is a bit sharper but sounds in tune with the double tongue. It also helps to think ti ki ti ki, not ta ka ta ka. The D's in Haffner can also be quite flat and I add the right hand Bb key to those. Bernard Garfield used to mix double and single to help the clarity of the ornament in the first 16 note solo of Beethoven 4 and can help raise pitch on the flat notes. His trick is quite useful to kick start the single tongue for many other passages.

Last edited by marydoob (2014-12-11 08:57:52)

Principal bassoonist, Orquesta Sinfonica de Galicia, A Coruña, Spain. Bassoonist, bassoon dad, bassoon husband, bassoon uncle, bassoon brother and bassoon son.