Topic: Looking for a great sharpening stone for my landwell reed knives

Hello,

I have a landwell beveled and landwell double hollow ground knife.  I have been using a dmt diamond stone fine to sharpen them.  But it seems that it wears the knife down so fast.

Can someone recommend a fine/extra fine india oil stone or water stone and where I can get one.  Maybe something like this as seen in this video.

https://youtu.be/28Ow3xP9i3g

Thanks for your help

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Re: Looking for a great sharpening stone for my landwell reed knives

Try a sharpening steel instead. I use them always! Use a diamond stone about once a month and the steel all other times. I think. MidwestMusicalImports has them.

Shawn Reynolds
Professor of Oboe/EH - Youngstown State University
Howland Schools - MS (director of bands); HS (Asst. Dir of Bands, Marching, Symphonic)

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Re: Looking for a great sharpening stone for my landwell reed knives

I use Hard Arkansas AC-13 stones.

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Re: Looking for a great sharpening stone for my landwell reed knives

I second the steel. I only use my diamond stones about once a month...steel is with me at all other times.

Shawn Reynolds
Professor of Oboe/EH - Youngstown State University
Howland Schools - MS (director of bands); HS (Asst. Dir of Bands, Marching, Symphonic)

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Re: Looking for a great sharpening stone for my landwell reed knives

The best knife sharpening system for any knife: http://www.surlatable.com/product/PRO-198418/

Yoshi Ishikawa
Professor of Bassoon, University of Colorado at Boulder, College of Music
Editor, IDRS OnLine Publications

Re: Looking for a great sharpening stone for my landwell reed knives

The best, quickest, smartest way to sharpen IMO is to use a machine. Until you grind a fresh edge on your knife, you will be wasting precious time trying to remove material on a stone that is designed for--let's face it--final honing.

This is the principal of sharpening all woodworking tools: planes, chisels, etc. First you grind, then you hone. Professional cabinetmakers and others who use these kinds of tools for a living don't waste their time laboriously pushing a plane iron or chisel against a stone.

My preference is for the Tormek machines, either the T-4 or the T-8. Granted, these are expensive, but considering how much oboists and bassoonists spend on profiling and gouging machines, they're just a drop in the bucket. With the Tormek and other waterstone machines, it's a two-step process: first you grind on a slow-moving waterstone, then you buff the edge on a leather buffing wheel primed with a special compound. The resulting edge is superior to anything you can achieve by hand, IMO, and much faster.

Christopher Brodersen
Maker of Historical Keyboard Instruments
Reviewer/contributor - Fanfare Magazine
Amateur bassoonist, baroque oboist, baroque bassoonist