Re: College studio recruitment and retention

I too am finding that the biggest concern and draw is scholarship $$. Teaching at a private college, who is slowly diminishing money available for scholarship, while steadily increasing tuition...its a huge concern for parents and students. One recently who audition on bassoon at over 10 schools (yes, you read that correct...over 10 schools) said the determining factor would be that "he would attend whomever gave him a full ride".

With the rising cost of higher education, this seems to be the largest concern from parents and students, which bleeds into we college professors.

On a lighter note, a personal email to the student with the offer of a free lesson seems to go a long way.

Shawn

Shawn Reynolds
Professor of Oboe/EH - Youngstown State University
Howland Schools - MS (director of bands); HS (Asst. Dir of Bands, Marching, Symphonic)

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Re: College studio recruitment and retention

PS. The other HUGE draw at my school is the amount of recruiting done by the college band director. He is GREAT at it and seems to get a lot of students through guest conducting at honors band festivals. In the big picture, the largest draw for recruitment and retention at my current position and another adjunct position I held several years ago, is the band program and the ban director.

Shawn

Shawn Reynolds
Professor of Oboe/EH - Youngstown State University
Howland Schools - MS (director of bands); HS (Asst. Dir of Bands, Marching, Symphonic)

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Re: College studio recruitment and retention

Inside Higher Ed has published a free, downloadable 32-page booklet and offers a forthcoming webinar on Strategies for Recruiting Students that may be of value to some applied music faculty. http://www.insidehighered.com/content/s … f5akq.dpbs

Last edited by Dwight Manning (2014-06-10 06:54:27)

Dr. Dwight Manning
Teachers College, Columbia University
Box 97 525 West 120th St. New York, NY 10027
212-678-8252  <dm2723@tc.columbia.edu>

Re: College studio recruitment and retention

Thanks Dwight!

Dr. Kent Moore
Principal Lecturer In Bassoon and Theory
Northern Arizona University

Re: College studio recruitment and retention

As a parent of a HS freshman oboist (actually I have triplet freshman & an 8th grader, so tuition is an unavoidable topic of concentration - it is guaranteed not just to rain, but to pour in our situation). My point I'd like to bring to the discussion is that although my oboist is entering a very strong and highly acclaimed HS band program, for an oboe player it is not ideal as she has to play another instrument for the half year of marching. So we are taking pre-emptive steps to build her exoeriences with regard to music because of her college aspirations. The thing is, she's also interested in following it he family trend by going to medical school. So, the approach I'm taking is contacting the few physicians that I know who are also part-time mucisians and asking them how they went about being a double major, when things got tough and when & if their came a time where things were too demanding to be a significant participant in the institutions music program. There seems to be a common thread that, yes, there is a time where you have to put aside your instrument or your scalpel. But the communication with the institutions music department right from the start, being upfront with regard to your goals seems to be what helped many of the current physicians and professional mucisians decide where they chose to attend.
HS bands, at least as far as I can tell, are not necessarily the best for bassoonist & oboist in preparation for their college careers. I'm trying to start early. I wasn't going to have her participate in the HS program because of this, but they recruited her with gusto. I guess that's good, but I'm still not convinced it's time best spent during marching season. She'll continue her weekly lessons with her private, professional instructor and participate in as many additional activities (the IDRS Teen Workshop) that we think will be advantageous for her when the time comes so she will, with any luck have a greater range of options than she'd otherwise have.
It's a tough call, tough predicament particularly for double reed instruments considering the middle and HS programs - and we live in an area that, fortunately has a very dedicated parent community that contributes financially to keep them on the leading edge.

Kristie

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Re: College studio recruitment and retention

In my opinion these are having a serious effect on all music recruitment - not just double reed recruitment: the ebbing of the latest "Baby Boom" (the candidate pool is receding); the recent recession has made people wary of careers in performing or teaching and there are too many post-secondary degree programs for potential music major to choose from.

Christopher Weait,
Principal bassoon, Toronto Symphony (1968 - 1985)
IDRS Honorary Member; Emeritus professor Ohio State University
www.weaitmusic.com

Re: College studio recruitment and retention

Kristie, your daughter is wise to plan ahead and make her intentions clear. Marching band requirements vary widely between districts and schools throughout the country, and those where it is required may make some concessions for a highly recruited oboist. For many double reeders, marching band season is a great opportunity to expand one's musical skill set on another instrument or perhaps as a drum major. Those pre-med students who persevere may have the great opportunity of performing with one of the growing number of physicians orchestras or bands around the country after beginning their practice--a term applied to both music and medicine.

Best wishes and keep us posted,
DM

Dr. Dwight Manning
Teachers College, Columbia University
Box 97 525 West 120th St. New York, NY 10027
212-678-8252  <dm2723@tc.columbia.edu>

Re: College studio recruitment and retention

I'm glad to see this thread now has over 10,000 views since I proposed this line of inquiry in Feb. 2012. Its puzzling that the dialogue has been advanced by myself and only 11 other contributors.  Please join us.

-looking forward to reading your comments,
DM

Dr. Dwight Manning
Teachers College, Columbia University
Box 97 525 West 120th St. New York, NY 10027
212-678-8252  <dm2723@tc.columbia.edu>

Re: College studio recruitment and retention

The key for me during the past 29 years has been building relationships with potential students.  My bassoon studio usually has 8-12 students, a few of whom might have scholarships averaging about $3000, and rarely are they acquired solely through a 15 minute audition.  My institution has a three week comprehensive summer camp for high school students, and a "Student for a Day" program that is hugely successful.  Today a potential music education student attended a music history class, played marimba in percussion methods, received a bassoon lesson, played in both the wind ensemble and the bassoon ensemble, met with the music education program coordinator, and the director of orchestras, and her smile at the end of the day said it all.  She felt accepted and valued, and we assessed the potential "fit."  It takes a significant investment of faculty and staff time to do this, and some students are not recruitable for musical or academic reasons, but overall the payoff is well worth it.  My institution is rather isolated; 90 minutes from population centers.  It can be difficult for faculty to get off campus, but getting potential students to come to us, and making them feel valued, has been the most effective recruiting tool.

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Re: College studio recruitment and retention

For those interested in recruiting international students:
https://www.insidehighered.com/audio/20 … l-students

https://www.insidehighered.com/sites/de … rPoint.pdf

-best to all,
DM

Dr. Dwight Manning
Teachers College, Columbia University
Box 97 525 West 120th St. New York, NY 10027
212-678-8252  <dm2723@tc.columbia.edu>

Re: College studio recruitment and retention

One of my greatest success is the fact that in addition to being the college oboe professor. I a. Also a middle and high school band director. I maintain a large private studio and often times some of those students are feeders into my college program. For those that are not serving both positions in my area, the largest problem I see is that they often forget that recruiting begins way back in middle school. "Getting" those kids early and making lessons "fun" for them goes a long way! Both college jobs I have held have resulted in large studios as a result of the private studio feeding into the college studio. I also keep pretty close touch with MANY of the local HS and MS band directors.

Shawn Reynolds
Professor of Oboe/EH - Youngstown State University
Howland Schools - MS (director of bands); HS (Asst. Dir of Bands, Marching, Symphonic)

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Re: College studio recruitment and retention

The subject of accountability is a big part of the current national discussion on education. Should college studio teachers be assessed according to the employment outcomes of their students? Should such data be publicly posted and become a significant factor in recruitment and retention?

-looking forward to reading your thoughts,
DM

Dr. Dwight Manning
Teachers College, Columbia University
Box 97 525 West 120th St. New York, NY 10027
212-678-8252  <dm2723@tc.columbia.edu>

Re: College studio recruitment and retention

WANTED: COLLEGE BASSOON PROFESSOR. Teach high school bassoonist; provide info on college admission and performing opportunities; discuss financial aid.

I had an engaging phone call earlier this week from Deanna, the mother of a high school bassoonist in Oklahoma, who described frustration around the mismatch between the pool of young bassoonists searching for college-level teachers and bassoon professors actively reaching out on the national level. She mentioned that few intra-state and inter-state college bassoon teachers seem to display an on-line presence and outreach efforts that attract the attention of her son and other high school bassoonists seeking opportunities.

This thread now has nearly 20,000 views over 4 years but very few respondents.

College bassoon professors--your thoughts?

-best wishes to those seeking a good fit,
DM

Last edited by Dwight Manning (2016-06-17 10:16:56)

Dr. Dwight Manning
Teachers College, Columbia University
Box 97 525 West 120th St. New York, NY 10027
212-678-8252  <dm2723@tc.columbia.edu>

Re: College studio recruitment and retention

30,000 views now since 2012 but only 12 individual contributors. This is your invitation to reply.

Dr. Dwight Manning
Teachers College, Columbia University
Box 97 525 West 120th St. New York, NY 10027
212-678-8252  <dm2723@tc.columbia.edu>