Topic: Reed tip profiler - Rieger, Reed n' Stuff, Miller "ultimate" reed mach

Has anyone had any experience with the Reiger or Reeds n' Stuff reed tip profiler??  Also, miller marketing has the "ultimate" reed finishing machine.  These tip profiling machines are quite expensive.  I'm just doing some research before I decide to buy one.  Any info would greatly be appreciated!  Thanks in advance!

Share

Re: Reed tip profiler - Rieger, Reed n' Stuff, Miller "ultimate" reed mach

I've had a Rieger tip profiler for some years now, and it is the one tool I wouldn't want to do without.

David

- - - -
David Ross
2d bassoon
Syracuse Symphony Orchestra

Share

Re: Reed tip profiler - Rieger, Reed n' Stuff, Miller "ultimate" reed mach

I've had a Rieger Tip Profiler for a little less than 6 months now.  I have been quickly and consistently producing some of the best reeds I've ever made, and am quite pleased with my purchase.  I got mine from Bob Williams of the Detroit Symphony. 

Frank Watson
Greenville (SC) Symphony Orchestra
Spartanburg Philharmonic Orchestra

Share

Re: Reed tip profiler - Rieger, Reed n' Stuff, Miller "ultimate" reed mach

Like Frank Watson, I think I've been making better reeds since I started using one about 6 years ago. I have two, both from Rieger. One is quite old - it has a green base if any one knows when that would be from. The other is about 2 years old. I am thinking of possibly selling that one, only because it is newer and looks better.

While these tip profilers only finish about a third of the blade, what they do well is give you a much more balanced front of the blade, the most critical area of the reed. Much better than you could do by hand, at least better than I could.

By removing washers, you could bring the scrape further back, but it's probably not a good idea depending upon how thick your profile is. I tried it and I didn't like the results. The stock template gives a bit more of a German scrape, a quick slope down on the rails. I've learned how to work with it. I would prefer that the machine worked further back and had more of a gradual slope on the rails. You can have a custom template made that suits your requirements, of course at a price. Maybe the "ultimate reed finishing tool" will do the trick.

I saw it in Ithaca at Miller's exhibit. I believe the manufacturer is Rimpl. It is more expensive than the Rieger, but it can go almost all the way back on the blade. What I liked about this newer machine are the following points:

1.) you could only turn the reed in very small increments because its rotation was controlled by a geared system that prevents quick side to side movement. This helps the next point.

2.) the cutting blade was rounded, so the amount of cane coming off was very narrow, which meant a much finer detail in the scrape

3.) and the carriage that houses the blade rolled on the template using a ball bearing, not a flat wheel. So this more precise point of contact transfers the template at a much high degree of detail, that when coupled with the rounded blade would give a much more finished reed.

I saw a very similar machine made by a Michael Kunibert. Even with the standard template, the reed came off the machine so well made that I played a rehearsal on it an hour later. Incredible! I can't wait to get my hands on one and get my own template.

I don't know how I survived all those years without one!

Harry Searing
Bassoon, Contrabassoon, Heckelphone
Faculty: Manhattan School of Music Precollege Division (NY), Montclair State University (NJ) &  CUNY (NY)
President, LRQ Publishing - featuring the bassoon music of Francisco Mignone

Share

Re: Reed tip profiler - Rieger, Reed n' Stuff, Miller "ultimate" reed mach

Thanks everyone who responded so far.

I've had experiences with the Rieger.  I was most curious about the other tip profilers out there and how they compare to the Rieger.  Thanks Harry the info on the Miller Ultimate Reed Machine.  Those are very expensive and relatively new on the market.   I would definitely have to research more before committing to buying one of those.  But this machine does intrigue me!

I've tried looking all over the net for info on Kunibert machines.  No luck.  Does he have a website?

Thanks,

Lobo

Share

Re: Reed tip profiler - Rieger, Reed n' Stuff, Miller "ultimate" reed mach

I have been hand profiling my reeds for many years, but when I purchased the Reiger Tip Profiler....it was a HUGE improvement in my reedmaking. I wouldn't be able to part with it now. EVER !!

Share

Re: Reed tip profiler - Rieger, Reed n' Stuff, Miller "ultimate" reed mach

I agree with the responses to this topic; I, like Harry, (hi Harry!) have two Reiger tip machines. An older one with a green base which I have set up for help with my baroque bassoon reeds, and a newer model. These machines have made my reeds more consistant and, more importantly, are a great time saver for knowing when to not work further on a reed that doesn't play right away with the characteristics that are important to me. I don't know what I would do without them. For my modern bassoon reeds, after much experimentation, what works for me is to extend the reed tip 2mm beyond the line scribed in the template ( I have the "standard" template). I have the machine set up so that it takes just enough out of the tip and "heart" of the reed for me to determine if the reed will have the potential for further work. I then mostly blend the back 1/2 of the reed to match the "finished" front 1/2 of the reed, altough there will still be some adjustments to the front half that has been done by the machine. It only takes about 10 minutes of hand work for me to finish a reed. That time saving alone, in my opinion, is worth the price of whatever machine you decide you want to have as long as you understand that they are reed "starters" not reed "finishers".
Charles McCracken

Share

Re: Reed tip profiler - Rieger, Reed n' Stuff, Miller "ultimate" reed mach

Charlie

Interesting note about setting up your profiler for a longer tip. I think you play an 8000 Heckel, yes? Do you find that you make out better with a lighter reed overall? I'm using a "parallel scrape" style reed, fairly short and flared reed but with a slightly longer and thinner tip and quite thin near the collar, with my very late 5000 Heckel, and find this works best on this horn (i.e., as opposed to the modern "wedge" type of design with more or less gradual thinning from back to tip with or without windows in the back).

I, too, am trying to decide what type of profiler to go with, and this string is really helping me decide!

-Thom

Share