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Viewing 3 posts - 16 through 18 (of 18 total)
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  • #104171
    Darlene Vandewater
    Participant

    I had the same experience with my student with the Yamaha— her parents bought the oboe through mail order; nobody even played it first! THEN they got a teacher (me) who would certainly have gone about buying an oboe differently. She has a few major issues on this oboe and it needs to be sent back to wherever it came from to be adjusted. I just wish they had had someone actually PLAY the oboe first, before they bought it!

    And of course I also got on the wrong side when I pointed this out


    I guess it didn’t help matters any at this point, but still…..Oh well, open mouth and in goes the foot. :(

    #104172
    Claire Binkley
    Participant

    You’re welcome, Kent.

    I’d like to agree that it’s really unfortunate how many unknowing parents just buy the cheapest instrument they can find regardless of quality and have it bite their kids in the posterior when they decide to be serious players. It IS hard to make such a financial investment when they aren’t even sure if their children will persue music, but that’s what music stores’ rental programs are for.

    #104173
    Lori Olson-Putz
    Participant

    In many small rural schools, we are lucky to have what ever instruments we have. We need to make them work the best we can. Granted there is only so much we can do, but we can keep the player working towards a goal of a better instrument as they get older. As a very good friend of ours at Forrest Music told us, “Face it, Bundy oboes serve a purpose. It is limited and should not be used for a long time, but they do start a player” I put Linton in the same boat. During that time, we teach good care of the reeds, what to look for, and how to maintain an oboe. the other is to introduce them to the “standard” fingerings and then add the trill/alternate fingers as the music demands. But with the bassoon especially, the “extra keys” can be determined by the bassoon, the reed, or the bocal.
    to compound the fingering problems, many of the new books are intended to have them play with the band right away because lesson time is being eliminated. The result is starting with odd notes. In one oboe method book I used this summer (helping a neighboring school), the third note introduced was 3rd space C#!!!! Let’s start right out battling embochure and all fingers at the same time!

    When I started oboe over 40 years ago, only professionals had the LH Fkey, but with time, a better oboe,and practice, I use it now. But to be honest, if I am sight reading and the part goes by fast, I find I still slip into the old habit. Many of my students play school instruments because they will never be able to purchase an instrument, so a conservatory instrument simply isn’t in their future until maybe college. In fact in many cases, I have deals with them that if they practice and take care of their istrument and reeds, I will give them reeds for free. You would be amazed how hard they work and the goals they set as a result. They realize they are a small number and that if they work hard, they can get scholarship aide in college and continue to play even if they don’t major in music. In small colleges across the country that is a big incentive to get players and with rising costs in tuition, it is an aide for the student as well. One of the biggest life lessons I try to give my students is that I teach English during the day, but I am a trained double reed player and continue to love and play into my 50’s. Being a musician doesn’t mean you have to go into teaching; sometimes we are lucky to play for the simply joy of playing.

    But it all starts with that old Linton or Bundy oboe, or a Conn bassoon, patience, and some interesting intonation battles!

    Lori Olson-Putz

Viewing 3 posts - 16 through 18 (of 18 total)

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